Lifestyle Things To Do

Spooky Spots Around Maryland

From ghostly bridges to haunted abandoned properties, our state has several spooky spots to check out during Halloween. Here are a few of our favorite picks!

From ghostly bridges to haunted abandoned properties, our state has several spooky spots to check out during Halloween. Here are a few of our favorite picks!

Glenn Dale Hospital

Glen Dale Hospital, Maryland
Photo Credit: WorldAbandoned.com

Glenn Dale Hospital was a massive tuberculosis sanatorium that later became an institution for the criminally insane. The building was shut down in 1981 due to concerns over asbestos.  

Today, Glenn Dale Hospital is condemned and allegedly haunted. Sightings have included patients wandering the grounds, apparitions of wild dogs, and smoke emanating from the crematorium. Strange moans, whispers, screams of agony, and banging sounds can all be heard deep inside the cavernous structure.

One of the most common spirit sightings is the apparition of a man in a straightjacket. It’s said that when he was alive, he went insane after an intruder slew his entire family as he cowered in a closet. He was so burdened with guilt, he stockpiled his medication and eventually took his life.

Crybaby Bridge

The haunting tale of the “Crybaby Bridge” is a pretty widespread Maryland urban legend. Located in Prince George’s County and crossing over the Patuxent River, this places Crybaby Bridge right in the middle of Goatman’s territory.

A baby tragically died in the river back in the 1950s, and locals still argue about what really happened that day. Some say a young mother threw her illegitimate child over the bridge, only to take her own life as well. A more recent theory focuses on the KKK and their ritual killing of African American children being responsible for the haunting of the bridge.

The Jericho Covered Bridge

Jericho Covered Bridge, Maryland
Photo Credit: Flickr / Craig Fildes

The rumor mill runs wild when it comes to the Jericho Covered Bridge near the Little Gunpowder Falls. Constructed in 1865, the most common yarn spun involves the silhouettes of bodies hanging from the rafters. Some believe they’re the ghosts of a horrific suicide pact, while others claim they’re the spirits of lynched enslaved people. 

Many late-night drivers have reported cars stalling on the bridge. Some have spotted powdery handprints appearing on their vehicles after crossing the bridge. Others have seen a ghostly woman crossing the bridge with a basket of fresh flowers or the spirit of a young woman with a burned face.

There are myths of strange and horrific creatures lurking around the bridge in addition to the ghost tales. One creature is described as a terrifying grey monkey with a massive tail. There have also been reports of a hideous red-eyed demon guarding the bridge.

Was there once a suicide pact involving a young couple in love? Do vehicles really stall for no reason when crossing the bridge? How many ghosts have actually been seen surrounding this spot? There’s only one way to find out… but we’ll leave the investigating to you.

Witch’s Grave Of Truxton Park

According to legend, a witch once lived and perished in Truxton Park in Annapolis. She was buried in the woods, just past the third baseball field by a slanted tree back in the 1800s. Her body disappeared and has never been found.

Even today, reports of bodies dangling from the tree continue to pop up around Halloween.

Green Mount Cemetery

Green Mount Cemetary, MD
Photo Credit: Atlas Obscura

There are two types of people in this world – those who have used the Ouija board, and those who avoid Ouija boards like the plague. Little do people know, the creator of the Ouija board lived right here in Maryland. Born in Bel Air in 1847, Elijah Bond is best known for patenting what we know today as the Ouija board. Bond died in 1921 and was buried in Baltimore’s Green Mount Cemetery, where his unique headstone still rests today. If cemeteries are your idea of a spooky Halloween, we can guarantee this will be a scary spot filled with plenty of spirits.

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